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The 3rd Action-Stop Motion  at Cabela's

The 3rd Action-Stop Motion

Author: Tri-Tronics

To train the 3rd Action, select a "stationary" command that you will use in the work you plan to do with your dog. For example, if you are training a pointing dog, it will be "WHOA;" a stock dog will typically use "DOWN;" a retriever will use "SIT," etc.

Practicing stopping without a rope

This section of the booklet describes the procedure for each of the three stationary positions. However, you should not train the dog on more than one stationary position to complete the Three-Action Introduction. If you try to do too much this early, your dog will become confused. Later, after he has thoroughly mastered the Three-Action Introduction, you can add other commands.

In the beginning, many dogs will learn more quickly if you fasten the collar on the dog in a position where the dog will tend to perform the action you want by moving away from the stimulation when you press the button. This makes it easier for the dog to learn to shut off the stimulation by performing the stationary command.

So, if you will be training "DOWN," put the collar contact points on the top of the dog's neck instead of underneath. If you are training "SIT," put the collar around the dog's waist with the contact points on the top of the dog's rump. If you are training "STAND" or "WHOA," locate the contact points underneath the dog's flank. (For some dogs, you will need to extend the length of the collar strap with an additional strap to fit it around the dog's waist.)

With the collar in this unusual place on the dog, you should start by selecting a lower level of intensity than the one you would normally use.

Lesson One - A Stationary Position is a "Safe Place" Goal: The dog learns that remaining in a sitting, standing, or lying down position after being given a command will keep stimulation "turned off."

Point of contact position.

These illustrations show the "point of contact" position of the collar. It should be positioned so that the dog will automatically tend to perform the action you want - on the rump for "Sit," under the flank for "Stand" or "Whoa," and on the top of the neck for "Down."

Select only one stationary command to use in completing the dog's Three-Action Introduction. Otherwise, the dog will become confused.



Procedure for Training the "Sit" Command Begin by putting the collar around the dog's waist so that the contact points are on the top of his rump. Use a lower level of stimulation than you would normally use, because dogs are more sensitive on the rump than the neck.

If your dog objects to the feel of the strap around his flank, have him sit quietly and do not let him move around while he gets used to the collar in this location. The strap does not bother him when he is not moving.

Start with the dog on a 6-foot leash. Place the dog in the "SIT" position without using any stimulation. Whenever he gets up, press the button as you command "SIT," and step toward the dog. Use the leash to guide him back into the "SIT" position. Release the button when he sits back down.

See how the position of the contact points on the top of the dog's rump helps him to discover that sitting is what you want.

Gently tug on the leash to tempt the dog to break his "SIT" position. Whenever he moves from the "SIT" position, press the low button as you command "SIT." Release the button when he is sitting again.

When you see the dog resisting the light tug of the leash, you know he has a good understanding and really wants to stay sitting in place. Praise him calmly - "Good. SIT." Repeating your command after the praise helps remind the beginning dog not to get up because of the praise.

If the dog tries to lie down during the training on "SIT," bump his front toes with your foot to encourage him to pull them away and sit back up.

Procedure for Training the "DOWN" Command Begin by putting the collar on the dog with the contact points on the top of his neck.

To start training on "DOWN," you will need a tie-out stake in the ground. This prevents the dog from running to the handler. Tie (do not snap) your long rope to the strap of the dog's collar underneath the dog's neck. Now run the rope through the ring on the tie-out stake. The tie-out ring should be as close to the ground as possible.

Place the dog in the "DOWN" position next to the stake without using any stimulation. Every time the dog starts to rise, press the button as you repeat "DOWN," and use the rope to guide him back into the "DOWN" position. Release the button the instant he lies back down.

See how the position of the contact points on the back of the dog's neck helps him to discover that lying down is what you want.

When the dog can do the above action well, remove the rope and put him on a leash. Command "DOWN" and step out to the end of the leash. Gently tug on the leash to tempt him to break his "DOWN" position. Whenever he moves from the "DOWN" position, press the button as you command "DOWN." Release the button the instant he lies down again.

When you see the dog resisting the light tug of the leash, you know he has a good understanding of what you want. Praise him for his correct decision.

Procedure for Training the "STAND" or "WHOA" Command Begin by putting the collar around the dog's waist so that the contact points are under his flank. Since the skin on a dog's belly is not as thick as that on the neck, be sure to start with the very lowest intensity level and use the lowest button on your transmitter.

Put the dog on a 6-foot leash and place him in the "STAND" position without using any stimulation. Whenever he moves, press the low button as you command "STAND" (or "WHOA" for pointing dogs) and step toward the dog. Use the leash to prevent him from moving toward you. Release the button when he stops moving.

See how the position of the contact points under the dog's flank helps him to discover that standing is what you want.

Gently tug on the leash to tempt him to break his "STAND" position. Whenever he moves, press the button as you command "STAND" or "WHOA," and step toward him if you need to. When you see the dog resisting the light tug of the leash, praise him for his correct decision.

Use light tugs on the leash to help the dog learn to stay motionless. Soon you will see the dog resisting the light tugs with determination. He has learned "what works" to keep the collar turned off.



Lesson Two - Obeying the Stationary Command (Sit, Stand, or Down) Goal: The dog learns that assuming the sitting, standing, or lying down position from motion when he hears the command will cause stimulation to stop.

Put the dog on a 6-foot leash and have him walk along beside you. Without using stimulation, give your command ("DOWN," "SIT," "STAND" or "WHOA"), and use immediate leash pressure to ensure that he stops and performs the command. It may also help to step quickly in front of the dog to block his forward motion. Praise him calmly for coming to a stop.

After several repetitions of coming to a stop without using the collar, begin pressing the stimulation button as you give your command ("DOWN," "SIT," "STAND" or "WHOA"). Right after you press the stimulation button, also use your leash to help guide the dog into performing the command, just as you did without the collar. Release the button when the dog is in the correct position and praise him. When you first praise him for stopping, repeat your command after your praise (for example, "Good. SIT.") so he will not interpret praise as a signal to move toward you.

Within one or two sessions, you should see him becoming quick at stopping from motion, and not need the assistance of your leash pressure or blocking technique to come to a quick stop when he hears your stationary command and feels the stimulation. Now you can phase out the use of the leash and blocking aids.

Practice until you no longer need to guide him with the leash, and he stops promptly on your command while you keep walking at the same pace. Drop the leash as you walk away. Don't forget to keep an eye on him and release the button the instant he has stopped in the correct position.

Once you see him becoming quick, phase out the use of the collar with each command. Instead, use the collar only if you have to repeat the command.

Lesson Three - Obeying the Stationary Command from a Distance Goal: The dog learns that, regardless of how far away his trainer is, he should immediately obey the Sit, Stand, or Down command to cause stimulation to stop.

At this stage, a tie-out stake in the ground will help the dog learn to comply when he is at a distance from you. The stake prevents the dog from coming to you before he understands how to turn off the collar by remaining stationary at a distance.

Place the dog so that the stake is between you and him, with the rope running from his collar through the ring on the stake to you. He should be about six feet from the stake; you should be standing 20-30 feet from it.

Now call the dog to come to you. Give your stationary command - "DOWN," "SIT," "STAND," or "WHOA" - as the dog passes over the stake, and guide him to a stop. Do not use stimulation this first time. Just repeat your command if the dog seems confused about obeying when he is on the rope.

Repeat this procedure a few times with just the rope before progressing to using stimulation. Now repeat this exercise, calling the dog to you and commanding him to stop as he passes over the stake. But this time, press the stimulation button just as you give the stationary command. Use the rope to stop the dog close to the stake and away from you. Release the button when the dog stops in the correct position. You can repeat the command, but make sure the button is down until the dog complies.

If the dog tries to move after coming to a stop, press the button again and repeat the command. Release it when he complies. Use the rope and stake to keep him at a distance from you. Repeat this until the dog is leaving slack in the rope while he comes to a stop on hearing your command. This shows you that he knows what to do to shut off the stimulation, and does not need the guidance of the rope.
Using a rope to stop your dog on command.

The dog must stop on command from motion without running to the handler. To introduce this idea, use a rope through a tie-out stake on the ground. Call the dog to you, then use the rope to guide the dog to a stop after you give the command. The dog is prevented from running all the way to you, and he quickly learns that stopping on command will succeed in shutting off stimulation.



To complete Lesson Three of the 3rd Action, remove the rope and practice stopping the dog from motion without it. Your dog is ready for this stage when you see him consistently leaving slack in the rope as he comes to a stop on command.

Practice Stopping without the Rope.
Back To Action 1.

Back To Action 2.

For a complete selection of Tri-Tronics Training Collars, click here.





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