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The River Runs, Period  at Cabela's

The River Runs, Period

Author: Gary Roach

If fishing is not as good as you like on your favorite lake right now, it may be time to take a trip to the river. There are miles and miles of rivers in Minnesota which can be very productive right now when the fish in the lakes are fat and happy and tough to catch.

Gary Roach hefts a fat river walleye.
If fishing is not as good as you like on your favorite lake right now, it may be time to take a trip to the river. There are miles and miles of rivers in Minnesota which can be very productive right now when the fish in the lakes are fat and happy and tough to catch.

The lure that gets the most mentions when river fishing is the topic is the jig. It's a great lure when tipped with a minnow, leech, or nightcrawler, and it also works well with a plastic grub-style tail.

In shallow areas you cast the jig, let it sink to bottom, and hop and pop the jig back to the boat. In deeper water use a vertical jigging approach.

My favorite river technique is the three-way-swivel rig. What you do is take a three-way swivel and tie it to the 20-pound test superline from your reel. On the second eye you tie a on a two-foot piece of eight-pound monofilament and attach a spinner, a few beads, and a number-four hook to this. On the third eye, tie on an eighteen-inch piece of eight-pound test monofilament line, and to the end of that tie a heavy bell sinker. The weight size will depend on the force of the current you're fishing.

Put a leech, minnow, or nightcrawler on the hook and drop the rig until the sinker hits the bottom. Under perfect circumstances you want the three-way rig to be an almost vertical presentation.

By lifting and dropping the sinker while you move around wing dams and rip-rap you can position the bait and let the current move the spinner.

The thing I love about river fishing is you never know what kind of fish is tugging on the end of that line. Could be a big walleye, could be a big catfish, either way it's going to be fun.





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