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Actual On the Water Chart Recordings  at Cabela's

Actual On the Water Chart Recordings

Author: Lowrance

The following chart records are from a Lowrance X-85 liquid crystal graph. It has 3000 watts of transmitter power, 240 x 240 pixel screen, and operates at 192 kHz.
X85 Sample 1
X-85 Sample 1
This shows a split-screen view of the water beneath the boat. The range on the right side of the screen is 0 - 60 feet. On the left, the screen has a 30-foot "zoom" range of 9 to 39 feet. Since the unit is in the automatic mode, (shown by the word "auto" at the top center of the screen) it picked the ranges to keep the bottom signal on the screen at all times. The water depth is 35.9 feet.

The unit was used with an HS-WSBK "Skimmer" transducer mounted on the transom. The sensitivity level was adjusted to 93% or higher. Chart speed was one step below maximum.

A. Surface Clutter
The markings at the top of the screen can extend many feet below the surface. This is called Surface Clutter. It's caused by many things, including air bubbles created by wind and wave action or boat wakes, bait fish, plankton, and algae. Many times larger fish will be seen feeding on the bait fish and other food near the surface.

B. Grayline
Grayline is used to outline the bottom contour which might otherwise be hidden beneath trees and brush. It can also give clues to the composition of the bottom. A hard bottom returns a very strong signal, causing a wide gray line. A soft, muddy or weedy bottom returns a weaker signal which is shown with a narrow gray line. The bottom on this screen is hard, composed mainly of rock.

C. Structure
Generally, the term "structure" is used to identify trees, brush, and other objects rising from the bottom that aren't part of the actual bottom. On this screen, "C" is probably a tree rising from the bottom. This record was taken from a man-made lake. Trees were left standing in many parts when the lake was built, creating natural habitats for many game fish.

D. Fish Arches
The X-85 has a significant advantage over many competitive units in that it can show individual fish with the characteristic arched mark on the screen. (See Why Fish Arch for more information.) On this screen, there are several large fish holding just off the bottom at "D", while smaller fish are hanging in the middle of the screen and near the structure.

E. Other Elements
The large, partial arch shown at "E" is not a fish. We were trolling near the entrance to a cove that had hundreds of tires banded together with wire cables. Other cables anchored the tires to the bottom. The large arch at "E" was created when we passed over one of the large cables that anchored the tires.
X85 Sample 2
X-85 Sample 2
This shows a full-screen zoom view of the water beneath the boat. The range is 8 - 38 feet, which gives a 30-foot zoom. Since the unit is in the automatic mode, (shown by the word "auto" at the top center of the screen) it picked the ranges to keep the bottom signal on the screen at all times. The water depth is 34.7 feet.

The unit was used with an HS-WSBK "Skimmer" transducer mounted on the transom. The sensitivity level was adjusted to 93% or higher. Chart speed was one step below maximum.

A and B. Fish Arches
The X-85 has a significant advantage over many competitive units in that it can show individual fish with the characteristic arched mark on the screen. (See Why Fish Arch for more information.) On this screen, there are several large fish holding just off the bottom at "B", while an even larger fish "A" is hanging directly above them.

C. Structure
Generally, the term "structure" is used to identify trees, brush, and other objects rising from the bottom that aren't part of the actual bottom. On this screen, "C" is probably a large tree or trees rising from the bottom. This record was taken from a man-made lake. Trees were left standing in many parts when the lake was built, creating natural habitats for many game fish.

D. Surface Clutter
Surface Clutter "D" at the top of the screen extends below 12 feet in places. Small fish can be seen beneath the surface clutter. They are probably feeding.